Question about daily injections

(13 posts)(6 voices)
  1. Hi there! I am reading a really great book about IVF, called The Couple's Guide to Invitro Fertilization, by Liza Charlesworth. It's really informative, and written in everyday language that is so easy to understand. Anyhow, I'm at the part where she is explaining the daily schedule of a typical cycle. I know many people are nervous about the daily injections (I'm one of them!) and she says the sub-q needles are 1/2 inch long, and IM ones are 1 1/2 inches long. Does that entire length get injected?? All 1 1/2 inches for IM??? I'm less worried about the sub-q's but the IM's are really freaking me out now that I'm reading that. I've had IM shots before, like vaccines or booster shots and things. Obviously I survived it, but I wasn't doing them on my own or having my husband administer it for the first time in his life. Is this as scary as it sounds? Thanks!

  2. The sub-qs are easy. Pinch the skin on your belly (if any?) and then shoot it quickly. 7 out of 8 times you won't feel a thing. If you do, it's a 1 out of 10. Press on the spot for about 5 minutes to minimize bruising. You won't feel a thing on the bruised areas (if any). They only look nasty.

    However the IMs can be a pain, which is why I opted for Crinone, a vaginal cream. When I had the PIO shots, my DH would shoot me up. I don't turn around to look b/c I have a fear of needles and they do look intimidating. Having said that, some women don't have a problem with it and some do. My theory is it depends how much muscle you have back there. I had a flat rump so there wasn't much room to work with. If you ice it before the needle goes in you really hardly feel a thing. Just a little bit of pressure. Have your DH inject slowly, about 25-40 seconds long. Then apply a heating pad and massage afterwards to distribute the solution. Also, find out where your sciatic nerve is as well as have the nurse draw on your behind. That'll give your DH more confidence and you'll feel better about it too.

    There are several threads about this and you'll find them if you do a search. Good luck!

  3. I was really afraid before my first cycle about the PIO shots. But then I thought, you know what -- if it works, these shots are going to be the least painful part of the whole process. You'll find the strength. You will be amazed by your strength.

  4. Here is a video of a woman who if giving herself a PIO shot.

    youtube.com

    I don't give myself the PIO shots, but it helped to watch. I ask DH not to jab but instead to push it in slowly. It really doesn't hurt. I also ask him to tell me when 25, 50, and 75 percent of the oil has gone in. As long as I know what is happening I am usually fine. Most of the time it doesn't hurt.

    Also I have heard that you should not ice the area before. The oil will harden when it hits the coldness instead of dispersing. It would probably cause more welts that way. The welts hurt more than the needle

    Good luck!

  5. Thanks so much for the encouragement from everyone! I think I will probably be okay with sub-qs. I have given insulin needles to other people, so I could do it. I'll just have to wrap my head around doing it to myself. I've heard of people giving themselves the IM's, which I think would be a great thing to learn, so you don't have to rely on anyone else. Is it true that they must always be given at the exact same time at night? (even if it's for several months?) My hubby often works in the evenings, and I'm wondering how late could the be given? If one day he is not home in time, I'd have to do it myself. That's a little scary! I will check out that video!! Thanks very much to all!!!

  6. FWIW, I give myself all the shots, sub-q and IM. It's really no big deal after the first time.

  7. Here is a video of a woman who if giving herself a PIO shot.

    youtube.com

    Thanks so much for that video! I have some questions now! How come she first used the 18g needle? Or was that so that the 25g one would be sterile when she injected herself? Do you throw out the needles after each use? What happens if you pull it out a bit and see the blood? Do you throw everything out and start over? Have you caused any damage to your vein or anything if that happens?

    Thanks!!

  8. Hi alifriqui,

    I can give you my thoughts on your questions...

    >>How come she first used the 18g needle? Or was that so that the 25g one would be sterile when she injected herself?
    Probably for two reasons. I think the larger (18g) needle is used first so it draws up quickly. But really you want to switch off that first needle because it is duller from going through the rubber material on the oil bottle. You want a fresh sharp needle to inject yourself.

    >>Do you throw out the needles after each use?
    Yes. Both needles get tossed every time.

    >>What happens if you pull it out a bit and see the blood? Do you throw everything out and start over?
    This never happened to me in nearly 100 progesterone shots. However, I have read that you should pull the syringe out, replace the needle with a new one, and restart the shot. I have heard that it doesn't matter that a little of your blood is in the shot since it is still sterile and it is your blood. Obviously if the thought of that bothers you then you can make up another fresh shot instead.

    >>Have you caused any damage to your vein or anything if that happens?
    I doubt it causes any serious damage to your vein. Maybe a bruise? Hopefully someone with direct experience can tell us though.

    In case you haven't already learned this: there are different kinds oil used to carry the progesterone. Some are thicker than others (and therefore harder to inject). I've only used PEO (Progesterone in Ethyl Oleate) and it doesn't even seem like an oil. It is very runny and seems fairly easy to inject.

  9. Thank you so much for replying to all my questions! That's very comforting. I thought of another couple!

    I think I read the progesterone shots must always be done at night, is this true?

    How much leeway (sp?) do you have in the time you must do it? Like say, 9pm one night, 11pm another night, for example. How strict is it? If I don't get the hang of doing it myself right away, I will need to rely on my hubby, and if his work schedule is wonky, I don't want to panic.

    Thanks!

  10. Hmm, I can't really answer this one for sure. These ideas are just some things I've heard but never really looked into.

    1. I never heard that the progesterone shots had to be done at night. I did hear that progesterone makes you sleepy, so I chose to do them at night. I've heard other people choose to do them in the morning because they say that walking around reduced the welts / dispersed the oil better. I guess ask your clinic what they recommend.

    2. I always thought the progesterone shots had to be done at the same time, and we always have. However I just asked my nurse last week because we will have a problem with one day (by 12 hours) and she said it doesn't really matter. Honestly, I would check with your RE on that one. I never trust anyone until I hear it the same way several times from different sources and from a doc (or two!) if it's really really important. I'll be checking again on this one myself :-)

  11. riccardo morri-wow that video made me cry just remembering it and all we do. I think it was the song that got to me.

    And yes Progesterone does/can make some people very sleepy-it can range from mild to completely forgetting your dreams. I also have always been told to keep my shots withing the same timeframe-say 1-2 hours every time...so my am shots would be between 7 and 9 and my evening shots between 7 and 9 as well-I like to keep them as evenly spaced as possible-but as riccardo morri mentioned-it's always best to ask your RE....I always deferr to them as even those of us who are so called "real life experts" may not have any of your specific background or medical history that your RE has access to.

    Best of luck-I know you can do it...for what it's worth the IM shots were easier for me to give to myself because I knew when they were coming and to be honest I didn't trust dh anywhere near me with a needle!

  12. >>What happens if you pull it out a bit and see the blood? Do you throw everything out and start over? This never happened to me in nearly 100 progesterone shots. However, I have read that you should pull the syringe out, replace the needle with a new one, and restart the shot. I have heard that it doesn't matter that a little of your blood is in the shot since it is still sterile and it is your blood. Obviously if the thought of that bothers you then you can make up another fresh shot instead.>>Have you caused any damage to your vein or anything if that happens? I doubt it causes any serious damage to your vein. Maybe a bruise? Hopefully someone with direct experience can tell us though.

    Damage to the vein isn't the concern (veins heal very quickly - think of all of those blood draws you've had over time). You just don't want to inject the medicine into a vein instead of the muscle. That's why the needle is removed if you see blood. Blood in the medication isn't a problem, so you can reuse the meds you've drawn up, just with a new needle (because you've dulled the first one from the injection). When I worked as a nurse I gave hundreds and hundreds of injections, and I never saw blood either.

  13. Thanks everyone for all this great information and advice!! It really does make me feel better to know that everything I "hear" is not necessarily true. I'll definitely make sure I ask the RE about all the specifics.

    I'll probably have more questions, and I'll come back and ask you guys too!

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