Full bladder for embryo transfer?? Oh my

(8 posts)(8 voices)
  1. I am a special situation. I tried to talk to the nurse about this. My delemia is that I have chronic IC with severe scar tissue around my bladder so that my bladder cannot distend well. The only time a urologist could get it completely full was under anesthesia. I will be undergoing anesthesia for my embryo transfer (for another reason anyway). I told the nurse that there was no conscious way I could get my bladder full due to my dissability, and being that I was going to be under anesthesia anyway.. could we have a uro there..and she was a snot about it. I still have yet to ask my doctor if a urologist can be there to distend my bladder while I am under anesthesia.. otherwise it won't work.

    Has anyone had any problems with the full bladder problem, have painful bladder syndrome and how did you get around this?

  2. I can certainly understand your concerns. I'm in Europe and have had 8 embryo transfers, 5 (or 6?) were u/s guided. None had to be with a full bladder. In fact, they asked if I wanted to go pee before because they wanted me to lie still afterwards.

    I know it's typical in the States to have a full bladder. I really wonder if it's necessary or just habit. (I mean here they try to make you put Foley catheters in before surgery BEFORE the epidural!?!? Just so you hurt a bit more or what?!?!) It would be interesting to see a fair study (with equal quality embryos etc) to see if it really makes a difference.

    I do think it's important to stick up for your rights when dealing with medical youngihmsonnel who act offended when the patient protests the cookie-cutter treatment for one reason or another. If they don't agree to do what you want, ask someone else there to help you. Don't just accept the first (or 2nd) no.

    Good luck.

  3. I had my ET today with a full bladder and it was so painful, I got up and pee'd as soon as the ET was done. I had no choice!! I'm worried now I ruined things not resting afterwards!! I would suggest not to have a full bladder if possible. GL-

  4. Hi!

    My understanding is that the full bladder helps to straighten the cervix so the cath can go in more smoothly and comfortably for you. I don't think this would be a problem if you're under anesthesia anyway. They don't want you to pee on the doctor or that snotty nurse do they ???

    It sounds like you need to talk to the doc in charge.

    GL

  5. I've had 5 transfers and never had a full bladder. I always go empty my bladder before going into the OR. That room is cold, even with the warm blankets they give me, and cold temyoungihmature makes me want to potty! There was no way I'm going to last through ET then wait 30 minutes to go, so why torture myself... My ART nurse told me that a full bladder helps to push your uterus closer to the surface for the sono to pick-up the image clearer and makes it easier for my RE to see my lining for transfering the embryos. She said since I had no tummy fat, I should be fine without a full bladder. My RE and I have the same chat at every ET... It goes like this...

    RE: Your bladder is not full.
    Me: Yep...

    While it does make it a little more challenging with some of the transfers for him to maneuver the sono wand to get a clearer image of my lining, he's managed to find it every time. That's why he gets paid the big bucks to do what he does. He's gotten me pg 3x from 5 transfers, but we won't talk about what happened to those pgs here...

    I wouldn't worry what your nurse is saying to you. She's not your Dr. Discuss it with your RE and basically tell him that you need to empty your bladder before ET for medical reason. He'll figure out how to make it work for you... That's his job. Your job is to take care of yourself. You want to be comfortable during ET for your peace of mind, body and spirit... Good luck!!!!

  6. I've had 16 transfers and some of them with full bladder (from SIRM) and they were so painful. I'm able to pee right away after the ET using a bed pan. The rest of the ET were with empty bladder. All ET were either chemical or BFN.

    The last 3 ET I had were u/s guided and those were done with an empty bladder. They're so much better b/c I was less stressed out having to worry about my full bladder.

    The RE can insert a foley catheter himself, but he has to use a special kind of foley catheter. It is called a "3-way Foley Catheter." This tube has an additional (3rd) hole where the RE can administer fluids (bladder irrigation fluid) directly into your bladder while the "output" end is clamped. When he's done with the ET, he unclamps the "output" end and your urine gets drained.

  7. A good compromise is to have a partially full bladder. I drank way too much for my first transfer and it was agonizing to have to wait to pee. The next time I peed and then drank about a half a bottle of water (I guess around 8 ozs) half an hour before the transfer. The nurses and ultrasound tech said my bladder looked youngihmfect. I think it just shouldn't be totally empty, but there is no point in torturing ourselves with a full bladder.

  8. Quote:
    A good compromise is to have a partially full bladder. I drank way too much for my first transfer and it was agonizing to have to wait to pee. The next time I peed and then drank about a half a bottle of water (I guess around 8 ozs) half an hour before the transfer. The nurses and ultrasound tech said my bladder looked youngihmfect. I think it just shouldn't be totally empty, but there is no point in torturing ourselves with a full bladder.

    This, exactly. Your nurse is just spouting off whatever the clinic's "official policy" is on how much fluid to drink. Ignore her. It's good to have some fluid in your bladder, but by no means does it need to be so full that you're uncomfortable. Eight ounces is plenty.

    Clinics make way too big a deal of this, IMO. I suspect it's largely a power trip on the part of the nurses. My doctors have never seemed to think it's that big of a deal.

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